The Art of Now: Six Steps to Living in the Moment (part 3)

Savor savoring the momentthe moment

We continue in our series on living in the moment with our focus on savoring this point in time in which we currently find ourselves.  Eckhart Tolle points out over and over in his teachings the fact the this moment, right now, right here, in this very place is all we ever have.  The past is gone, it’s just a memory.  The future is not yet here, and when it does arrive, it’s now — this very moment.  So why not learn to savor the moment — the only thing we have right now?

To avoid worrying about the future, focus on the present (savoring).

In her memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert writes about a friend who, whenever she sees a beautiful place, exclaims in a near panic, “It’s so beautiful here! I want to come back here someday!” “It takes all my persuasive powers,” writes Gilbert, “to try to convince her that she is already here.”

rushing through the dayOften, we’re so trapped in thoughts of the future or the past that we forget to experience, let alone enjoy, what’s happening right now.

We sip coffee and think, “This is not as good as what I had last week.” We eat a cookie and think, “I hope I don’t run out of cookies.”

enjoy the momentInstead . . . relish or luxuriate in whatever you’re doing at the present moment—what psychologists call savoring. “This could be while you’re eating a pastry, taking a shower, or basking in the sun. You could be savoring a success or savoring music,” explains Sonja Lyubomirsky, a psychologist at the University of California at Riverside and author of The How of Happiness. “Usually it involves your senses.”

When subjects in a study took a few minutes each day to actively savor something they usually hurried through—eating a meal, drinking a cup of tea, walking to the bus—they began experiencing more joy, happiness, and other positive emotions, and fewer depressive symptoms, Schueller found.

Why does living in the moment make people happier—not just at the moment they’re tasting molten chocolate pooling on their tongue, but lastingly?

Because most negative thoughts concern the past or the future. As Mark Twain said, “I have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.” The hallmark of depression and anxiety is catastrophizing—worrying about something that hasn’t happened yet and might not happen at all. Worry, by its very nature, means thinking about the future—and if you hoist yourself into awareness of the present moment, worrying melts away.

The flip side of worrying is ruminating, thinking bleakly about events in the past. And again, if you press your focus into the now, rumination ceases. Savoring forces you into the present, so you can’t worry about things that aren’t there.

Here’s to savoring and living in the moment.

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

CLICK HERE for part 4 – “Inhabit the Present — Breathe”
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One Response to The Art of Now: Six Steps to Living in the Moment (part 3)

  1. Pingback: The Art of Now: Six Steps to Living in the Moment (part 2) - a Passion for Life Coaching

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